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The Center for Lifespan Psychology

Founded in 1981 by the late Paul B. Baltes, the Center for Lifespan Psychology (LIP) at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development has helped to establish lifespan psychology as a distinct conceptual approach within developmental psychology. Since 2004, the Center has extended its research program into developmental behavioral neuroscience. Work at the Center is guided by three propositions:

  • to study lifespan changes in behavior as interactions among maturation, learning, and senescence;
  • to develop theories and methods that integrate empirical evidence across domains of functioning, timescales, as well as behavioral and neural levels of analysis;
  • to identify mechanisms of development by exploring age-graded differences in plasticity.

The Center continues to pay special attention to the age periods of late adulthood and old age, which offer unique opportunities for innovation, both in theory and practice. At the same time, it has continuously increased its research on behavioral development during earlier periods of life.

A Philosopher of the Enlightenment Era: Tetens

Tetens

"But ... its eminent modifiability, and its predisposition to self-initiated action, may it develop little or much, and may it differ in amount between different individuals, is among the immutable features of humankind, which can be found whereever humans exist."

Johann Nicolaus Tetens (1736-1807), philosopher of the Enlightenment Era

The Center's Projects

The Center for Lifespan Psychology's eight projects follow its guiding propositions and examine different facets of human development across the lifespan. Further information is available under Projects.

Recent Publications

Kleemeyer, M. M., Kühn, S., Prindle, J., Bodammer, N. C., Brechtel, L., Garthe, A., ... Lindenberger, U. (2015). Changes in fitness are associated with changes in hippocampal microstructure and hippocampal volume in older adults. NeuroImage. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1016/ j.neuroimage.2015.11.026

Kühn, S., & Lindenberger, U. (2016). Research on human plasticity in adulthood: A lifespan agenda. In K. W. Schaie & S. L. Willis (Eds.), Handbook of the psychology of aging (8th ed., pp. 105–123). Amsterdam: Academic Press.

Verrel, J., Lisofsky, N., Kühn, S., & Lindenberger, U. (2016). Normal aging increases postural preparation errors: Evidence from a two-choice response task with balance constraints. Gait & Posture, 44, 143–148. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.12.002

See also here.

Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research

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Cooperation With University College London (UCL)

The Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research was launched in April 2014. It is based on an initiative by scientists from the Max Planck Society and UCL targeting the development and application of computational methods that reorganize and improve our understanding of mental illness and behavioral aging.

Further information

Contact

Director:
Ulman Lindenberger
Ulman Lindenberger Porträt
seklindenberger [at] mpib-berlin [dot] mpg [dot] de

New Software

Onyx Logo |

The graphical structural equation modeling software Ωnyx has been released. It was developed by the Center for Lifespan Psychology and the University of Virgina, and is available free of charge!

von Oertzen, T., Brandmaier, A. M., & Tsang, S. (2015). Structural equation modeling with Ωnyx. Structural Equation Modeling, 22, 148–161. doi: 10.1080/ 10705511.2014.935842

LIFE

LIFE is a graduate program of the Max Planck Society. Human development across the lifespan is its research topic.

More information on LIFE

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In Memoriam

Paul B. Baltes Porträt

Paul B. Baltes
(1939–2006)

 
 
 
 
 
1980–2004 Director of the Center for Lifespan Psychology

Further information