Lifespan Neural Dynamics Group

This Emmy Noether Group is part of the Berlin site of the Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research and is affiliated with the Center for Lifespan Psychology.

Interests within the Lifespan Neural Dynamics Group (LNDG) center on the examination of EEG/fMRI brain signal variability and dynamics in relation to lifespan development, cognition, neurochemistry, network dynamics, and brain structure.

Further information on this Emmy Noether Group's work can be found here.


<h2 data-snippet-id="4e17e480f8">Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research</h2>
The Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research was launched in April 2014. It is based on an initiative by scientists from the Max Planck Society and University College London (UCL) targeting the development and application of computational methods that reorganize and improve our understanding of mental illness and behavioral aging. more

Funding


Selected Publications

Kloosterman, N. A., Kosciessa, J. Q., Lindenberger, U., Fahrenfort, J. J., & Garrett, D. D. (2020). Boosts in brain signal variability track liberal shifts in decision bias. eLife, (9), Article e54201. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.54201
Kosciessa, J. Q., Kloosterman, N. A., & Garrett, D. D. (2020). Standard multiscale entropy reflects neural dynamics at mismatched temporal scales: What’s signal irregularity got to do with it? PLoS Computational Biology, 16(5), Article e1007885. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007885
Garrett, D. D., Epp, S. M., Kleemeyer, M., Lindenberger, U., & Polk, T. A. (2020). Higher performers upregulate brain signal variability in response to more feature-rich visual input. NeuroImage, 217, Article 116836. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116836
Kloosterman, N. A., de Gee, J. W., Werkle-Bergner, M., Lindenberger, U., Garrett, D. D., & Fahrenfort, J. J. (2019). Humans strategically shift decision bias by flexibly adjusting sensory evidence accumulation. eLife, 8, Article e37321. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.37321
Garrett, D. D., Epp, S. M., Perry, A., & Lindenberger, U. (2018). Local temporal variability reflects functional integration in the human brain. NeuroImage, 183, 776–787. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.08.019
Garrett, D. D., Nagel, I. E., Preuschhof, C., Burzynska, A. Z., Marchner, J., Wiegert, S., Jungehülsing, G. J., Nyberg, L., Villringer, A., Li, S.-C., Heekeren, H. R., Bäckman, L., & Lindenberger, U. (2015). Amphetamine modulates brain signal variability and working memory in younger and older adults. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(24), 7593–7598. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1504090112
Garrett, D. D., Samanez-Larkin, G. R., MacDonald, S. W. S., Lindenberger, U., McIntosh, A. R., & Grady, C. L. (2013). Moment-to-moment brain signal variability: A next frontier in human brain mapping? Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 37, 610–624. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2013.02.015

Garrett, D. D., Kovacevic, N., McIntosh, A. R., & Grady, C. L. (2011). The importance of being variable. Journal of Neuroscience, 31, 4496–4503. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5641-10.2011

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