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Summer Semester 2015

Seminar: Histor(ies) of Emotions: Gender, Self and Morality in Criminal Legal Cultures

Seminar: Histor(ies) of Emotions: Gender, Self and Morality in Criminal Legal Cultures

Laura Kouine  (MPI for Human  Development)
Gian-Marco Vidor (MPI for Human Development)
Offered at the Humboldt Universität zu Berlin

This course examines histories of emotions, gender and selfhood through the lens of criminal legal cultures. By examining case studies of criminal trials and legal contexts from the medieval period to present day, this course interrogates how ideas about gender, emotions, the self, morality and legal responsibility changed (or did not change) over time. Criminal records – depositions, court testimonies, and media reporting – afford the historian a unique access to both normative understandings of categories such as emotions, gender and selfhood, but also to practices: how was gender, the body, and the self experienced and given meaning in the courtroom? Moreover, legal records are particularly rich sources since they give voice to people otherwise lost to the historical record: women as well as men, poor as well as rich. For more information, see the course syllabus.

Seminar: NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST: CARDINAL DIRECTIONS AS CULTURAL CODE IN MODERN HISTORY

Seminar: NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST: CARDINAL DIRECTIONS AS CULTURAL CODE IN MODERN HISTORY

Prof. Dr. Paul Nolte (Freie Universität Berlin, Friedrich Meinecke Institut)
Offered at the Freie Universität Berlin

The West promises bounty and freedom, the North is chilling, but clear and rational, the East is foreign and different, the South may be seductive and dangerous at the same time: These are certainly clichés, and probably stem from a „Western“ perspective. We can’t seem to escape notions of culture that are expressed as cardinal coordinates, or as dichotomies between opposing poles on the compass. This seminar takes a look at those directional clichés as historically situated cultural codes, with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. We will look at emergence, semantics, functions, and socio-political contexts of those codes, including the fundamental opposition between East and West, Orient and Occident. For more information see the course syllabus.

IMPRS Moral Economies Peer Colloquium

IMPRS Moral Economies Peer Colloquium

Each session of the colloquium is organized by one or two PhD students and seeks to address theoretical and methodical questions pertinent to their research. All sessions are open to colleagues from outside the IMPRS. For more information, see the course syllabus (PDF).