EnglishDeutsch

Conferences

Conference: Sounds - Klänge - Töne | MPFG "Gefühlte Gemeinschaften? Emotionen
© MPI fuer Bildungsforschung

The Max Planck Research Group 'Felt Communities?' has realized numerous meetings, conferences, symposia, and a summer school in recent years. Here you can obtain an overview.

Konferenz 'Sounds - Känge - Töne'

Sounds Klaenge Toene | Poster zur Konferenz
© MPI fuer Bildungsforschung

Sounds, Klänge, Töne – Zur klanglichen Dimension von Musik und ihrer emotionalen Bedeutung und Wahrnehmung

24.04.-26.04.2014

Organizer: Tim Biermann – Anabelle Spallek – Henning Wellmann

From Viennese Classic to Berlin club culture, from garage punk to Baroque church chorales, from modern chamber music to open air festivals - all these musical sound worlds have already been studied from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. But what is the context of each sound world’s specific sound / tone and its emotional perception, action and dissemination? We understand sound and tone as a combination of acoustic, emotional, and semantic elements, which obtains certain effects and meanings in the performative perception of the listeners. So why is it that Beethoven’s music (in the 19th century) is associated with having a male sound? What happens to the emotional coding and reception of music in specific historical and cultural contexts when instrumental sound is altered by electrical amplification or when singers produce new vocal sounds due to different vocal techniques?

... Read more in the Exposé

Resonances: Music, Affect, and the City

Resonances: Music, Affect, and the City | Poster
© MPI fuer Bildungsforschung

Resonances: Music, Affect, and the City

07.11.-08.11.2013

organized by Luis-Manuel Garcia and Oliver Zauritz in cooperation with Harvard University’s Sawyer Seminar, “Hearing Modernity”

What emotional significance do music and musical instruments have for ethnic and religious minorities, such as Berlin’s Alevi community? How do inhabitants as well as tourists identify with the feeling and sound of Berlin’s music scenes? This two-day conference, organized by the Max-Planck-Institute for Human Development in collaboration with Harvard’s Sawyer Seminar, “Hearing Modernity”, seeks to explore the ways in which emotional, embodied experience intersects with sound and the urban landscape.

Although this conference places a special emphasis on Berlin’s local music scenes, scholarly presentations will range as widely as devotional music in India, indigenous music in Canadian public schools, and European Jazz Festivals. While remaining grounded in particular themes and concrete case-studies, this gathering will generate new ideas and raise new questions relevant to broader discourses of aesthetic experience, embodiment, and collective life. Further highlights the Keynote Address by Harvard jazz scholar Professor Ingrid Monson, entitled, “Improvisation and the Sensory Turn in Music Studies.”

Using “music,” “affect,” and “the city” as keywords, this conference aims to create and capture resonances between a diverse, international array of scholars and music-industry professionals. The organizers are committed to nurturing dialogue between academia and popular media, and so, in addition to scholarly presentations, this event with feature roundtable discussions with professionals from Berlin’s local music scenes. In the evenings, activities will extend into music events featuring sound installations and performances, furthering the exchange between academic theory and musical practice.

EMOTIONS_LEARNING_MUSIC

Summer School 2013

EMOTIONS_LEARNING_MUSIC. Interdisciplinary Summerschool 2013

01.07-05.07.2013

organized by Dr. Sarah Zalfen, Iris Törmer

Which role does the emotional dimension of experiencing and learning music play? The historical dimension states that earlier different forms of music education in different functions of society were built. Music education is more than a temporary fashion and is not taking place in a historical vacuum. Neuroscientific approaches are promising new perspectives on the question of what is happening on the neuropsychological level, when the famous spark ignites, and which function music can have in the context of processes of learning.

Despite the currency of the topic, the issue of music education yet seems to lack a sufficient degree of conjunction. It oscillates between educational policy, the experience of single participants of music-educational events, and last but not least the booming interest on the neuronal origins and processes of human abilities and emotions. The central questions about the relevance of music for educational processes have increasingly drifted
apart. The summer school aims to connect the history of music and emotions, psychology, and neuroscience with conceptual and practical approaches of music education. Our intention is to build a hub of discussion on the impact of the interrelation of music, education and emotions – beyond music in school and music schools.

We would like to discuss this frame of an exciting topic with junior researchers, music educationists, and renowned scientists of all disciplines for the first time in July 2013. We will try to find new insights of relevance for the sciences as well as educational and cultural politics.

Music, Memory, and Emotions in the German‐Jewish Experience of Modernity

Music, Memory, and Emotions in the German-Jewish Experience of Modernity | Pos
© MPI fuer Bildungsforschung

Music, Memory, and Emotions in the German‐Jewish Experience of Modernity

14.03.-15.03.2013

Veranstalter: Yael Sela‐Teichler, with Philip V. Bohlman, University of Chicago/Hochschule für Musik, Hannover

Throughout the Middle-Ages and the early modern period, Jews in central and western Europe were excluded from the soundscape of Christian culture as an a-musical category. This ethos began to change in the mid-eighteenth century with the rise of new German aesthetic theories that linked music’s emotional affect with ethical qualities inherent in Enlightenment notions of Bildung. Marking the threshold to modernity, this inclusive turn opened up music as an arena of cultural participation to Jews, even though this inclusivity remained vulnerable to socio-political developments throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Konferenzbericht

Ambiguities of Communication. Musical Life and the Emergence and Fragmentation of Social Relations in the Twentieth Century

Kommunikationschancen | Ambiguities of Communication | Poster
© MPI fuer Bildungsforschung

Ambiguities of Communication. Musical Life and the Emergence and Fragmentation of Social Relations in the Twentieth Century

24.01.–26.01. 2013

Organizer: Sven Oliver Müller • Jürgen Osterhammel • Martin Rempe

Within the last few years, the topic of music and history has moved from a peripheral position closer to the center of more professional attention. This development has been benefitted by historians who concentrate on the history of opera, which is naturally leaned on nationalism and middle class research and so added to this new perspectives. Furthermore the discovery of the auditive in the broadest sense of postmodern historical anthropology and a history of the senses and sensuality gains more meaningin the landscape of research.

Konferenzbericht

Hegemoniale Strukturen der Musik. Besatzungspolitiken, Emotionen und ihr Transfer im Europa der Weltkriege 1914–1949

Hegemoniale Strukturen der Musik | Poster
© MPI fuer Bildungsforschung

Hegemoniale Strukturen der Musik. Besatzungspolitiken, Emotionen und ihr Transfer im Europa der Weltkriege 1914–1949

11.03.-13.03.2011

Organizer: Sven Oliver Müller

The meeting analyzes the hegemonic transfer, the concept, the scope and limits of the political use of art and pop music during the two world wars in Europe. The focus is on the music policy of the German Empire, Italy, France, Britain and Russia, or the Soviet Union respectively. Attention is given to already occupied and vacant states on the one hand, and to the domestic political strategies and successes of the musical campaigns on the other.

Konferenzbericht